Month: July 2014

Harvest 2014 in Kyrgyzstan: racing against time, self-sufficiency unlikely

As of July 21, about one-fifth of the summer harvest in Kyryzstan had been completed, the local news agency 24.kg [http://www.eng.24.kg/community/171531-news24.html] reported. On a surface of 117,800 hectare, a total of 211,800 tonne had been harvested, the report read, referring to the Minister of Agriculture and Land Reclamation Taalaibek Aidaraliyev. This means that in the order of 23 per cent of the expected harvest of 512,200 tonne has been collected. This is in the order of one-third of the expected harvest of 1.55 million tonne of cereals as posted by the US Department of Agriculture for this year.  ...

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Kyrgyzstan to revive iron ore mining

Iron ore deposits have long been recognised in Kyrgyzstan. But the absence of operative steel industry has withheld miners from starting up any mines since exportation of mere iron ore, given the high transportation costs and lack of nearby markets, was not considered profitable. This, however, is going to change in years to come. “Sary-Talaa kench LLC won an auction for the right to use the Nadir iron mine on July 28 in Batken region, AkiPress [] reported this week referring to the press service of the State Agency for Geology and Mineral Resources of Kyrgyzstan.”The Nadir iron mine...

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Mining in Kyrgyzstan: backups for Kumtor dadlock cause confusion

With Canadian exploiters at each other’s throats over stakes in Kumtor, which is still Kyrgyzstan’s most important mining operation, and Kyrgyzstan’s own interest in it at risk because of dubious Canadian court rulings reminding one of the sweet old habits of the Sheriff of Nottingham, risk spreading and interest diversification remain on top of Kyrgyzstan’s present-day agenda. However, a clear-cut strategy including a no less clear-cut time table towards investors, operators and contractors has not been drafted yet, and contradicting rules and conditions tend to confuse candidate operators for new projects. Selection procedures remain flawed, and auctions for concessions...

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Repairing Bishkek: turning the city green, clean and (rather) safe

Opening an electricity box in the staircase of a residential building can be quite hazardous, and the inside often looks like a man’s intestines as seen on operation tables. As for gas, water and sewage systems, worn-out hardware is their network’s main feature as well. Realising that funds for thorough, major-scale workovers are absent, the authorities of the Kyrgyz capital have listed priorities with the first and foremost aim to avoid calamities for its 0.9 million-plus urban dwellers..   “About 90 million soms are allocated for repair of heating networks of Bishkek,” 24.kg wrote in a news report [http://www.eng.24.kg/economics/171588-news24.html]...

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Kyrgyzstan’s living standards: how poor can you be?

With strong economic growth percentages year-on-year into the current decade, Kyrgyzstan is showing signs that the end of a two-decade of misery for large parts of the population could be in store – provided strong economic performance can persist. In order to monitor the developments on the socioeconomic side of the story in a better manner, the World Bank has developed new criteria for measurements of the effects of economic changes on people’s living standards. Under the new standards, Kyrgyzstan looks better off than previously. “The Kyrgyz Republic has been re-classified from a low income country to a lower-middle...

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